Science, Philosophy and a Smidgeon of Spunk!

snoadmin

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Photo by Austin Weaver

Whether there is one true religion and whether all religions are basically the same: thought provoking questions such as these are posed when Nicole Saunders, a psychology and philosophy double major, hosts philosophy lunches on Wednesdays. Inevitably ensuing discussion which, in its development, brings forth many more questions such as whether a table is less of a table if it is also used as a chair. Debate on these concepts highlighted the discussion Wednesday, March 28.

At first the places at the table remained spotty as there were only four people present. Gradually, however, each seat filled and the table became filled with minds wealthy in spiritual and scientific points to make. The discussion was mostly dominated by campus minister, Sean Froehling; a campus security officer, Dave Gathro; and a sophomore glassblowing and ceramics major, Richard Banach.

At one point, the discussion almost took on the feel of an intervention. Ricky Banach spoke from a unique perspective. After an argument over the individuality of tables and whether it degrades a table to have many uses, Sean Froehling posited that Banach may be in danger of “not seeing things as they are.”

It began with the question of whether we can know the one truth. This developed into an intellectual domino effect of inquiry. The possibility that things may or may not present themselves to people in the same way was followed by the assertion that tables can be the same, but wait….

“By us agreeing on a table, do we some how diminish it’s creativity? You can say it’s a table, but over time it changes. People sit on it and make it a chair,” Banach said.

Froehling rebutted with a counter question.

“The fact that we have multiple uses for it, does that diminish it as itself?” he said.

Eventually the conversation found its way back on track to profound questions of truth, reality, satisfaction and more.

Everyone at the table got a word in edge wise, expressing opinions on religion and its relationship with science. No two opinions were the same.

Froehling and Banach continued their battle of the wits throughout the entire hour. When it turned to a tangent about being able to measure the length of a table with thermometers, Froehling asked Banach to “take responsibility” for what he was “deconstructing.”

All the while Froehling happily proclaimed, with a grin on his face, that he was able to measure the table in thermometers because “That’s creativity!” Before it could devolve anymore Sanders, ever the mediator, stepped in and turned the conversation back to the group as a whole.

Dave Gathro placed the point on the table that we as people are trapped in a world of limitations. Members of the group ran with the idea and returned to the conclusion that since humanity is so limited it has to be willing to make a leap of faith now and again.

The motley crew parted ways on the ever cheerful exclamation of Banach.

“Perfection is boring!”

As the discussion reached its end, many of those involved departed from the room with smiles of epiphany plastered on their faces and a daily dose of profundity on the tips their tongues.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email