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The Aquarian’s Rebirth

Past+issues+of+the+Aquarian+are+displayed+for+readers.
Past issues of the Aquarian are displayed for readers.

Past issues of the Aquarian are displayed for readers.

Walter Merz

Walter Merz

Past issues of the Aquarian are displayed for readers.

Dominique Washington, Contributing Writer

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JACKSONVILLE, Fla. –  Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, the Aquarian Literary Arts magazine will be born again into its latest masterpiece.

Being decorated with works of art by Jacksonville University students, the staff hopes to garner a win in the Associated College Press Pacemaker competition later this year.

On Feb. 14, the Aquarian staff held its weekly meeting in Council room 103 to finalize the 50 submissions that will appear in this year’s Aquarian.

“Would anyone like to champion a piece?” said Hannah Thompson, editor-in-chief of the Aquarian.

One by one each board member took a turn saying why the pieces they have championed deserved a spot in the magazine. The board members voted on works based on the use and execution of literally devices, poetic devices, and composition.

“We are being more selective this year,” said Alexandria Pulliam, board member and event coordinator for the Aquarian. “Allowing us to fully develop this year’s theme.”

Being a Magazine Pacemaker Finalist in 2017 afforded the Aquarian an opportunity to be critiqued by literary magazine professionals.

In honor of the Aquarian’s 48 years of publication, Thompson and the staff wanted to be creative and set this year’s magazine in a new direction.

The staff discussed big changes coming to the magazine including a new lay-out of the magazine and, more importantly, the size and look of the magazine. Smaller details, like which font types would be used, were also debated by the staff.

“We want to create a magazine that is better than ones before,” Thompson said. “While giving it a more magazine look and feel.”

One way, Pulliam said, is to carefully select the magazine’s theme, to have it match the ethos and content of the long-running Aquarian.

“Reflective,” she said.

In revamping the Aquarian, the staff hopes the students of JU will want to be more involved with the magazine.

“A lot of people do not know JU has a literary magazine,” said D’Ayn Sayre, designer for the Aquarian. “We want the Aquarian to capture everyone on campus.”

The staff plans to increase the Aquarian’s reputation and membership by throwing a release party for its 48th edition in early April.

As a senior, Thompson says she’s thankful for the opportunities the Aquarian has given her, allowing her to publish work she never dreamed of sharing as a college student.

“The Aquarian offers students a platform,” Thompson said. “To share their voices with the entire campus.”

 

 

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The Aquarian’s Rebirth