Art in the Palm of Their Hands

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Photo By: Courtney Jimenez

Smart phones have never been just a device for calling a loved one or sending a text message to a friend. These computers, encased in slick sheets of metal and glass, connect many people of the modernized world with portable, unlimited internet to the World Wide Web.

Increased usage and demands for faster, more organized access to information and entertainment have resulted in applications to take over the smart phone world. They range from “apps” designed track the exact location of others to those that can transform a picture into a mock-painting.

On Thursday, Sept. 5, Jacksonville University’s John Turnock, associate professor of art, orchestrated an art show showcasing photos taken strictly by iPhones. These photos were then turned into artwork, many of them made to look like real paintings rather than pictures.

It isn’t the type of show that is normally done, Turnock said.

“It’s an unusual show that hasn’t been done very often, so it’s kind of exciting for the artists and us,” Turnock said, in a Sept. 5 Florida Times-Union article. “I invited artists from around the world to participate. Some of the participants are professional photographers, some are amateur artists, but all are intrigued by the possibilities offered by technology.”

The advances in smartphone technology offered these professionals a different artistic medium for their talents.

“The pictures are truly amazing,” said Ashley Simon, JU junior and international business major. “I didn’t know they were pictures until someone told me. A lot of them seem a little morbid and gothic but the way they were transformed to look like a painting it absolutely fascinating. I wish I new how to do something like this.”

All artwork in the exhibition was printed on campus on recycled, acid-free paper.

The show, which is free and open to the public, will be on display weekdays through Oct. 2.

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